Crimes and criminals vocabulary


Glossary of crimes
Glossary of crimes

felonyhomicide (by misadventure, with malice, calculated…, )
manslaughter
smuggling = bootlegging
bigamybaby- or wife-battering
assault
arsonembezzlement
fraud
forgery
counterfeit
piracyaccident fraud
swindling
perjuryabuse of power
disorderly conduct
speedingmugging – robbery with violence
slandertreasonconspiracy
espionage – spying
drug peddling
larceny (gang larceny)
shopliftingburglarypick-pocketingpetty theft
hijackingblackmailkidnappingsexual harassment
bribery and corruption
trespassingterrorism
criminal attempt
Which of the above would or could involve the following?
counterfeit money
pornographyhostagesa ransom
heroinbetrayer
state secrets
contrabanda store detective
weaponMatch the names of different crimes:
taking a child away from his or her family
not paying taxes on goods from another country
getting money by promising not to tell the secret
selling cocaine
taking control of an airplane by force
taking goods from the shop without paying
going into a house and stealing
to be married more than one at the same time
take money and property from the company or state secretly
to get whatever from subordinates
shout and fight at night time
to put fake lables of famous brands on goods from Chinato make documents look legal with the help of colour printer and scanner
to set private buildings and premises on fire
to lie at the trial
Classify the crimes
In pairs, discuss which crimes are serious and which are petty:
arsonbribery burglarydrug dealingdrug possession
drunk driving fraud hackingkidnappingmanslaughter
murder pickpocketing robberyshopliftingterrorism
159448520193000Serious crimes:
158940516764000Petty crimes:
Complete the following table:
VERB NOUN(crime) NOUN(person)
To stealThiefTo robRobberyToBurglaryBurglarTo commit offenceOffenceToMuggingMuggerTo murderMurderToForgeryForgerTo shopliftShoplifterTo kidnapkidnapperArson Pickpocketing Fraud Below you see the story of an extraordinary case in British legal history. The affair started in 1949 and was finally closed in 1966.
At the moment, there are a number of gaps. Use the words below to complete it.
trial to be convicted
arrestedpardonsuspectallege confessedenquiry (x2)
innocentjudgestriedto be charged with courtsentencedto plea
to be executed custody
juryappeal
apprehendedstatements guiltyexecution dropped
huntdeniedThe story began when a man called Timothy Evans was ________for the murder of his wife and a baby. He was ____with double murder, but a short time later one of the charges was _____and he was _____ for the murder of his daughter only. During the _______ Evans accused the man whose house he had been living in, John Christie, of the crimes, but no attention was paid to him. The _____found Evans _____ and he was __________ to death. An _____ was turned down and he was _____ in 1950.
Some time later, more women’s bodies were discovered in Christie’s house: about six. John Christie was a police’s key ______and they started a nationwide _______ for him. He was soon_____. Alleged ______by Christie while he was in ______ cast doubt on the Evans hanging. When he went to ________, Christie __________ that he murdered Mrs Evans, but in private it was said that he ______to that crime. His ______of insanity with regard to other murders was rejected and he was ________of killing his wife.
Soon afterwards there was an _____into the_____of Timothy Evans. The ____decided that justice had been done and Evans had been rightly hanged. It was only in 1966that another _______was set up. This time it was decided that Evans had probably been _____and he was given a free ______. Better later than never, as they say.
Match the idioms with their definitions:
To do something by the book A skilful thief who breaks into places without disturbing people or setting off alarms.
To cook the books/accounts To accept the consequences of doing something wrong.
To face the music If you do something illegal, you will probably be caught and punished
To do something under the table To be in prison.
To get away with murder To keep inaccurate accounts for a business, usually in order to pay less tax.
A partner in crime To do something secretly, usually because it’s illegal or unethical.
To be behind bars To be in prison
A cat burglar Not to be punished for bad behaviour.
To serve time To do something strictly according to the rules or the official procedures.
Crime doesn’t pay A person who helps you to make a secret plan to do something wrong or dishonest.
Fill in the sentences with appropriate idioms:
My lawyer is a very accurate specialist, he does everything .......................................Police arrests are being given maximum publicity as a reminder that .....................................................................................................................................After the criminal ............................................................................, he was released.
One of the directors had been ..................................................... and the firm had been losing money for years.
Charles Peace is commonly cited as one of the most prolific ........................................ in history, he broke into thousands of houses during his lifetime.
After drinking alcohol all night, the next morning I had to ......................................................... I had a bad hangover.
Murderers have to be put ..................................................... for the rest of their lives.
A lot of these people work 80-hour weeks with all or half of their salaries paid ...........................................................That guy always ..................................................................—just because he's cute.
Ex-judge’s ............................................. has been sentences to 33 months in prison.

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