Викторина англоговоряшчие страны


викторину “Do you know Great Britain?”
How many parts are there in Great Britain?
What river is the capital situated on?
Who is the head of the country?
What is the home of the Queen?
What is the double-decker?
What is Big Ben?
What is the symbol of England?
Where did the detective Sherlock Holmes live?
What is the most famous lake in Scotland?
Why is the city Bath called so?
Who is the most famous woman-writer of detective stories?
What books of English writers do you know?
What is the oldest part of London?
What is the symbol of Scotland?
What is the symbol of Wales?
What is the Scottish national costume?
What is the national instrument of Scots?
When do British people celebrate Christmas?
Who wrote about Winnie the Pooh?
Who is the writer of “Mary Poppins”?
Who is the author of books about Harry Potter?
Can you guess:
He was English. He was born in 1564. He was a writer and actor. (W. Shakespeare)
He was born in London. Then he lived in the USA. He was a film actor (Ch. Chaplin)
He conquered Great Britain. He was a king. He built the Tower of London (William the Conqueror)
23. Put these holidays in the correct order:
a) New Year’s Day,b) April Fool’s Day,c) St. Valentine’s Day,d) Christmas
Викторина для 8 - 9 классов “Do you know the USA?”
What is the name of the Dutch settlement which became New York City?
Which country presented the USA with the statue of Liberty? What was the occasion?
In which famous place do people in New York City celebrate New Year’s Day?
Which American rock-and-roll star lived in Memphis, Tennessee?
What monument in Washington D.C. dedicated to an American President is nicknamed “The Pencil”?
What is the name of the famous collection of museums in Washington?
Explain the symbolism of the stars and stripes on the US flag.
On what river is the capital of the USA situated?
Where does the President of the USA live and work?
Which is the biggest state in the USA?
Who was the 1st President of the USA?
What do the Americans celebrate on the 4th of July?
In which city is Hollywood?
What street in New York is called “The Great White Way”?
What is the highest building in Washington?
Who was the 1st President lived in the White House?
What is the largest city in the USA?
In which state do the highest trees in the world grow? What are they called?
Which is the smallest state in the USA?
Who is the President killed by Oswald?
The first colonists started the tradition of a) Halloween, b) Independence Day, c) Thanksgiving Day, d) Memorial Day.
Who was the 42d President: a) Clinton, b) Kennedy, c)Johnson, d) Washington
Викторина для учащихся 10-11 классов “Do you know Australia?”
What kind of state is Australia?
Who is the Head of Government?
Who is the Head of the State?
What colour is the flag of Australia?
Which are the national colours?
Where is the seat of the state government located?
How many chambers are there in the Australian Parliament?
Which city was the capital of Australia till 1917?
What are the languages in Australia?
What animals can be seen on Australia’s coat-of-arms?
Which is the hottest month of Australia?
Which is the highest point in Australia?
Which is the longest river in Australia?
What are the largest cities of Australia?
When was the first white settlement founded in Australia?
Who sailed to Botany Bay first?
When did the constitution come into effect?
When did the first shipload of free immigrants arrive?
Who was the first European settles in Australia?
Who discovered Australia?
What is the official name of Australia?
When do the Australians celebrate Australia’s Day?
What does the name Canberra mean in the Aborigine language?
What can one find in Sydney and in London?
Who proposed the name of Australia?
How Canberra is often called?
Who was Melbourne?
Who was Brisbane?
In whose honour did they call the city of Sydney?
Who was Adelaide?
How do the Australians call their natural countryside?
When did the last full-blood Tasmanian Aborigine die?
What is the Pav?
Why do most children in Australia study through correspondence courses?
What is the largest sandstone monolith in the world?
Australian English
ЦЕЛЬ УРОКА – формирование языковой компетенции
ЗАДАЧИ УРОКА –
1. Совершенствование лексических навыков
2. Совершенствование навыка аудирования3. Совершенствование навыка чтения с полным пониманием.
4. Совершенствование навыка аналитического мышления.
Данный урок-лекция основывается на ранее изученной теме “Varieties of English” блока №8 УМК“MATRIX”, intermediate (Kathy Gude, Michel DuckworthИздательство Oxford University Press, 2002 г.) и служит образцом для создания собственных проектных работ учащимися. В конце урока учащимся предлагается выбрать тему для работы над проектом ‘VARIETIES OF ENGLISH’
ХОД УРОКА
Приветствие.
Сообщение темы и цели урока.
Лекция с демонстрацией слайдов.
Выполнение задания на перевод с австралийского на русский.
Аудирование песни на австралийском языке.
Socio-Historical Linguistic Context
Australian English began diverging from British English shortly after the foundation of the Australian penal colony of New South Wales in 1788. British convicts sent there, (including Cockneys from London), came mostly from large English cities. They were joined by free settlers, military personnel and administrators, often with their families. However, a large part of the convict body were Irish, with at least 25% directly from Ireland. There were other populations of convicts from non-English speaking areas of Britain, such as the Welsh and Scots.
Already in 1827 Peter Cunningham, in his book Two Years in New South Wales, reported that native-born white Australians of the time spoke with a distinctive accent and vocabulary, with a strong Cockney influence.
The transportation of convicts to Australia ended in 1868, but immigration of free settlers from Britain, Ireland and elsewhere continued. Thus, the former Australian English began as a mixture of Cockney, Irish, Welsh and Scotish.
The American military personnel in World War II brought American influence; though most words were short-lived; and only okay, you guys, and gee have persisted. Since the 1950s the American influence on language in Australia has mostly come from pop culture, the mass media, computer software and the internet. Some words, such as freewayand truck, have even been naturalised so completely that few Australians recognise their origin.
American, British and Australian variants exist side-by-side; in many cases – freewayand motorway (used in New South Wales) for instance – regional, social and ethnic variation within Australia typically defines word usage. Words of Irish origin are used such as bum for "backside" (Irish bun), tucker for "food", as well as one or two native English words whose meaning have changed under Irish influence, such as paddock for "field".
Variation and Changes
Three main varieties of Australian English are spoken according to linguists: broad,general and cultivated. They often, but not always, reflect the social class or educational background of the speaker.
Broad
Australian English is recognisable and familiar to English speakers around the world because it is used to identify Australian characters in non-Australian films and television programs.
The majority of Australians speak with the general Australian accent British words such as mobile (phone) predominate in most cases.
Cultivated
Australian English has some similarities to British Received Pronunciation, and is often mistaken for it.
There are no strong variations in accent and pronunciation across different states and territories.
Australian English has some peculiarities in pronunciation.

But surely, the most remarkable changes appeared to be in vocabulary.
Vocabulary
In 1945 Sidney J. Baker published the book The Australian Language which was a milestone in the emergence of a separate Australian Standard.
Australian English has many words that some consider unique to the language. One of the best known is outback,, meaning a remote, sparsely populated area. Another is The bush meaning either a native forest or a country area in general.
Fair dinkum can mean “are you telling me the truth?”, “this is the truth!”, or “this is ridiculous!” depending on context - the disputed origin dates back to the gold rush in the 1850s, “dinkum” being derived from the Chinese word for “gold” or “real gold”: fair dinkum is the genuine article.
Extinct East Midlands dialect in England: dinkum means hard work or fair work
Dinky-di means true or devoted: a ‘dinky-di Aussie’ is a ‘true Australian
G'day is well known as a stereotypical Australian greeting - it is worth noting that G'day is not synonymous with the expression “Good Day”, and is never used as an expression for "farewell". Many of these terms have been adopted into British English via popular culture and family links.
Speaking about word-forming, we may say that Australian English has a unique set of diminutives formed by adding -o or -ie (-y) to the ends of (often abbreviated) words. There does not appear to be any particular pattern to which of these suffixes is used.
Examples with the -o ending include
Australian English
AboAggroAmbo
ArvoAvoBizzoDeroEvoGarboJourno
MilkoServo
SmokoThingovejjoStandard English
Aborigine-(now considered very offensive)
Aggressive
Ambulance office
Afternoon
Avocado
Business
Homeless person
Evening
Garbage collector
Journalist
Milkman
Service(gas) station
Smoke or coffee/tea break
ThingVegetarianExamples of the -ie (-y) ending include
Australian English
Aussie
Barbie
BeautieBikkieBitieBrekkieBushieChewieChokkieCozzieChrissie
ExyKindieLippy
MozzieOldies
PostiePrezzieRellieSickieSunniesSurfySwaggieTrackiesTruckieVedgieStandard English
Australian
Barbeque
Beautiful
Biscuit
Biting insect
Breakfast
Someone who lives in the bush
Chewing gum
Chocolate
Swimming suit
Christmas
Expensive
Kindergarten
Lipstick
Mosquito
Parents
Postman
Present
Relatives
Day off sick from work
Sun-glasses
Surfing fanatic
Swagman
Tracksuit
Truck driverVegetableOccasionally, a -za diminutive is used, usually for personal names.
Barry becomes Bazza,
Karen becomes Kazza andSharon becomes Shazza.
There are also a lot of abbreviations in Australian English without any suffixes. Examples of these are the words
beaut(great, beautiful),
BYO
(Bring Your Own restaurant, party, barbecue etc),
deli (delicatessen),
hoon (hooligan),
nana (banana),
roo (kangaroo),
uni (university),
ute (utility truck or vehicle)
Influence of Australian Aboriginal languagesSome elements of Aboriginal languages have been adopted by Australian English –mainly as names for places, flora and fauna (for example dingo) and local culture. Many such are localised, and do not form part of general Australian use, while others, such as kangaroo, boomerang, budgerigar, wallaby and so on have become international. Beyond that, little has been adopted into the wider language, except for some localised terms and slang. Some examples are cooee and hard yakka. The former is used as a high-pitched call, for attracting attention, (pronounced ) which travels long distances. Cooeeis also a notional distance: if he's within cooee, we'll spot him. Hard yakkameans hard work and is derived from yakka, from the Jagara language once spoken in the Brisbane region.
We cannot but mention unique and, indeed, colourful Australian metaphors and similes, as
as bald as a bandicoot –совершенно лысый
as cunning as a dunny rat - коварный, пронырливый
as lonely as a country dunny – покинутый, одинокий
flat out like a lizard drinking – очень занятый
let alone Australian expressions, as
in full feather – при полном параде
rough end of a pineapple - неудачная сделка,
not to know Christmas from Bourke Street - не иметь понятия
not to have a brass razoo – очень бедный
dingo’s breakfast – без завтрака
etc.
These are the best-known Australianisms in the English-speaking world.
Australian EnglishWorld Standard EnglishamberbeerarvoafternoonbarbiebarbecuebarrackcheerbeautgreatblokemanchookChickenclobberClothescrookIlldakstrousers (BrE), pants (AmE)
dinkumgenuine, trueevoEveningG'dayHellolollysweet (BrE), candy (AmE)
nanaBananaoilInformationOzAustraliaPom(my) EnglishsheilaWomansnagtuckersausagemealsSumming up, we may say that it is quite possible to understand Australian if you know some peculiarities of the language.
Brain-Ring"Across the Books by British Writers"
Ход урока
1. Начало конкурсной программы. Представление жюри.
2. Meeting the teams. Представление команд.
We are team … . My name is … I like … books. My favourite writer is …
3. Warm-up. Разминка
Find the words in this word search.
playfdfgpabubieahodetectivefihstorymbookilymtjkrnovelasciencenladventureAnswers: play, detective, story, book, novel, science, adventure; author, fiction, fairy tale, poem. 12 words (count each word)
4. Speed Quiz “British Writers”
In turns name British writers. Let’s see who knows more. The winner gets 3 points, the second team – 2 points, the third team – 1 point.
Подведение итогов конкурса “Разминка”
5. Writers Quiz. Викторина о писателях.
Look at the photos of 5 British writers. Listen to the questions and choose the name of the writer. The photos: A. Christie, R.L. Stevenson, J.K. Rowling, R. Kipling, W. Shakespeare.
She is called the queen of a detective novel. She wrote 68 novels and some plays. (A. Christie)This English writer is famous for his plays, poems and sonnets. (W. Shakespeare)This writer spent his childhood in India and his famous book is about this country. (R. Kipling)This author became famous very quickly. The story about a boy-magician is called the best-seller of children literature. (J.K. Rowling)Подведение итогов конкурсов
6. Books by British Writers. Произведения британских писателей
Translate the names of the books by famous British writers.
“Treasure Island”
“Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”
“The House At Pooh Corner “
“The Jungle Book”
“The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes”
‘Harry Potter and the Secret Room”
“The Lord of the Rings”
“Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe”
“Ten Little Negroes”
“Romeo and Juliet”
Match the names of the books with the names of their authors.
“Treasure Island”
“Alice in Wonderland”
“A House “
“The Jungle Book”
“The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes”
‘Harry Potter and the Secret Room”
“The Lord of the Rings”
“ Robinson Crusoe”
“Ten Little Negroes”
“Romeo and Juliet” A.C. DoyleR. KiplingL. CarrollJ.R.R. TolkienA.A. MilneD. DefoeR.L. StevensonW. ShakespeareA. ChristieJ.K. RowlingAnswers: 1)g, 2)c, 3)e, 4)b, 5)a, 6)j, 7)d, 8)f, 9)i, 10)h
7. Guess the Character of the Book. Герои книг.
Each team chooses a card with the description of a book character. They read and guess it. Extra points are for the name of the book and the author.
Card 1. This girl is fond of different stories and adventures. One day she got in an unusual world where everything is strange. She became smaller and bigger. She met a rabbit, a cat and even two queens. (Alice from “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” by L.Carroll)
Card 2. This boy didn’t have a usual family. But he had true friends among animals. He was strong and brave. He was not afraid of wild animals. He could fight even with tigers.
(Maugly from “The Jungle Book” by R. Kipling)
Card 3. This man is a real Englishman. He likes music and he can play the violin. He is very intelligent and he likes to solve riddles and secrets. Many people ask him for help. (Sherlock Holmes from “The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes” by A.C. Doyle)
Подведение итогов предыдущих конкурсов
8. The Wise Contest. Конкурс знатоков.
We invite the wisest contestants of each team. We hope you know a lot about British literature. Listen to the questions and try to answer them.
L. Carroll is famous for his books. But where did he work? What was his job? (a Maths teacher)
What holiday do people in Stratford-upon-Avon celebrate on 23 April? (Shakespeare’s birthday)
How many years did Robinson spend on his island? (28 years)
What is the name of the third book about Harry Potter? (Harry Porter and Askaban’s Prisoner)
What was written on Winnie Pooh’s House? (Посторонним в…;)
Whose real name is Charles Lutwidge Dodgeons? (L.Karroll)
9. Spectators’ contestI’m going to tell you the names of the writers. You will tell me their surnames.
Arthur Conan ……. Doyle; 5) Daniel ………….. Defoe;
Joseph Rudyard……… Kipling; 6) Robert Lewes……….. Stevenson;
Lewes…………….. Carroll; 7) William…………… Shakespeare;
Alan Alexander…………… Milne; 8) Joanne Kathleen …………..Rowling.
Discover American English
Aim
: Draw a comparison of British and American English
Present some of the differences in vocabulary, grammar, spelling and pronunciation.
Teaching Notes.
1. Warming up. Discussion.
Are there big differences in the way people speak your language?
Are there some words that are only used in certain places?
What differences in pronunciation are there?
2. English across the Atlantic.
2. 1 Words you know
Do you know any words from American English?
Can you tell the difference between British and American English?
How do British and American English sound different?
Work with a partner, brainstorm as many words as you know which are different in American and British English. Hints: spelling, vocabulary, grammar differences, etc.
Add some more words that your teacher knows.
UK English USA English
rucksack
queuepetrolblock of flatstrousersdustbinshopboot (of a car)
bonnet (of a car)
chemistgarden
liftlorrytapcookercinemaundergroundpavementpostboxjamcrispschipsbiscuitssweetstarmacholidayautumnbackpack
linegasapartment buildingpantstrashcanstoretrunk (of a car)
hood (of a car)
drugstoreyard (a garden in US English tends to specifically refer to a vegetable garden)
elevatortruckfaucetstovemovie theatresubwaysidewalkmailboxjellychipsFrench friescookiescandypavementvacationfallSome more differences:
Spelling
US English uses ‘-or’, where UK English uses ‘-our’.
Color colourNeighbor neighbourUS English uses ‘-er’, where UK English uses ‘-re’.
Center centre
Theater theatre
Grammar
American English and British English sometimes use different prepositions.
AE: It’s twenty of six. It’s five after nine.
BE: It’s twenty to six. It’s five past nine.
American English doesn’t use the Present perfect as much as British English.
AE: I think I broke my leg.
BE: I think I’ve broken my leg.
Pronunciation
‘r’ is often not pronounced in British English. It is always pronounced in American English.
AE: car /ka:r/ hard /ha:rd/
BE: car /ka:/ hard /ha:d/
‘a’ is usually short in American English but is often long in British English.
AE: ask banana
BE: ask banana
2.2. British or American?
Listen to six people speaking. Are they British or American?
Write ‘BE’ or ‘AE’ for each one.
TypescriptWell, I don’t think British and American English are so different. (UK)
They sound different, but most of the words are the same. There aren’t any real communication problems. (USA)
I was talking on the phone to someone over there and he said he would give me a ring later. I thought, is he mad? A ring? What for? Anyway, he meant he was going to call me later! (USA)
The accent’s different, that’s all really. Oh, and some words. (UK)
I was in London once and asked somebody where the nearest drugstore was. They didn’t know what I was talking about! They say chemist or something. (USA)
They say cookies, we say biscuits. They say jelly and we say jam. It’s just words like that. (UK)
3. Some differencesWhy is it all right to walk on the pavement in Britain, but not a good idea in the USA?
If you asked for chips in an American restaurant, why would the waiter be surprised?
Why would people in Britain be surprised if you asked for gas for your car?
‘Pavement’ in Britain is ‘sidewalk’ in the USA.
‘Pavement’ in the USA is ‘tarmac’ in Britain.
‘Chips’ in the USA are in Britain ‘crisps’ in Britain.
‘Chips’ in Britain are’ French fries’ in the USA.
‘Gas’ in the USA is ‘petrol’ in Britain.
Read the sentences. Where does each person come from – Britain or America?
Can you tell me where the nearest chemist is? (Britain)
Do you have a trashcan here? (United States)
Is there a subway near here? (United States)
I live in a block of flats. (Britain)
It’s quarter of three. (United States)
Take the lift. It’s quicker the walking. (Britain)
Match the British English and American English words.
1. Holiday 2. Biscuits 3. Cinema 4. Underground 5. Sweets 6. Autumn 7. Postbox 8. Cooker 9. Rucksack 10. Tap a. fall b. stove c. candyd. mailboxe. backpackf. faucetg. vacationh. subwayi. movie theatrej. cookies
gjihcadbef1. Mother to son in the car:’ I just went to the shops and bought all this food. Could you open the boot for me, please?’(British English)
2. Please line up on the right – hand side for movie tickets. (American English; The word ‘movie’ is also used in Britain now.)
3. Jim: ‘Which way do you want to go to Grandma’s?’
Tracy: ‘Let’s just take the highway; it’s faster. ’(American English)
4. Anna: ‘Where did you go for your holidays?’
Susan: ‘We went to Greece. It was fab. ’(British English)
5. Tom: ‘I’d like a large portion of chips with that fish, please. ’(British English; ‘fish and chips’ is a typical dish in Britain. What the rest of the world refer to as ‘chips’ (crisps in the UK) is commonly served in bags.)
6. Clerk in fast - food restaurant: ‘Do you want a bag of chops with that sandwich?’ (American English)
4. Separated by the same language?
What does the headline mean? Discuss this quotation by George Bernard Shaw means, historically and today. Do you know any historical events that may have shaped differences between Americans and British people? Do you personally know any Americans or any British people? Have you noticed any differences? What about British and American TV programmes and movies? Or newspapers and magazines? You may look at some web pages for major British and American papers and see if you can see any differences.
Students may be asked to prepare for this discussion for the next lesson.
They can compare newspapers on the web, for example, The New York Times (www. nytimes. com) and The Guardian (>www. gurdian. co. uk) for differences.
Background information
George Bernard Shaw, the author of this quotation was born in Dublin, Ireland; in 1856. His family was too poor to send him to university, so he was self-taught. When he was in his early twenties, he moved to London worked as journalist. After hearing a lecture on nationalization, Shaw become interested in the socialist movement and soon joined various socialist organizations. Besides writing for and about socialism, he started to write plays, often with a political background. Major Barbara, Man and Superman and Saint Joan are some of the most famous. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1925. George Bernard Shaw died in 1950.
Although this lesson presents American English and British English as two distinct varieties of English, in reality there is enormous variation within each country – both regionallyand socially, and in terms of register. The differences presented in this lesson are generalizations.
The ‘standard ‘English of Britain is generally taken as the speech of educated people who live in London and the south – eastern part of England (typified by ‘BBC English’), but this is only one of many regional dialects (which include London Cockney, Northern dialects, Midland dialects, South Western dialects, Welsh dialects, and Scottish, Cornish, and Irish dialects ).
It is more difficult to talk in terms of a ‘standard’ American English and there is a considerable number of dialect regions across the United States. United States English has also had a strong influence on Canadian English.
In addition to British and American, there are also many other varieties. There are distinct Australian dialects and New Zealand dialects as well as South Asian (including India and Pakistan) and South African varieties. There are also varieties in each of the African states where English is an official language (Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi, Uganda, Kenya, The Gambia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Ghana and Liberia).
People often ask which is the ‘correct’,’ best’, or ‘purest’ form. There is no answer to that question as each variety has evolved to meet the needs of the people who speak it. Some varieties have a higher status than other varieties, mainly because they are the varieties spoken by these that economic and/or political power.
STUDENT’S HANDOUT
1. Discussion.
Are there big differences in the way people speak your language?
Are there some words that are only used in certain places?
What differences in pronunciation are there?
2. English across the Atlantic.
2.1. Words you know
Do you know any words from American English?
Can you tell the difference between British and American English?
How do British and American English sound different?
Work with a partner, brainstorm as many words as you know which are different in American and British English. Hints: spelling, vocabulary, grammar differences, etc.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Add some more words that your teacher knows.
2.2 British or American?
Listen to six people speaking. Are they British or American?
Write ‘BE’ or ‘AE’ for each one.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
3. Some differences
Why is it all right to walk on the pavement in Britain, but not a good idea in the USA?
If you asked for chips in an American restaurant, why would the waiter be surprised?
Why would people in Britain be surprised if you asked for gas for your car?
Read the sentences. Where does each person come from – Britain or America?
Can you tell me where the nearest chemist is?
Do you have a trashcan here?
Is there a subway near here?
I live in a block of flats.
It’s quarter of three.
Take the lift. It’s quicker the walking.
Match the British English and American English words.
Holiday
Biscuits
Cinema
Underground
Sweets
Autumn
Postbox
Cooker
Rucksack
Tap a. fallb. stove c. candyd. mailboxe. backpackf. faucetg. vacationh. subwayi. movie theatrej. cookies
Read the sentences and decide whether they are written British English or American English.
Mother to son in the car:’ I just went to the shops and bought all this food. Could you open the boot for me, please?’
Please line up on the right – hand side for movie tickets.
Jim: ‘Which way do you want to go to Grandma’s?’
Tracy: ‘Let’s just take the highway; it’s faster. ’
Anna: ‘Where did you go for your holidays?’
Susan: ‘We went to Greece. It was fab. ’
Tom: ‘I’d like a large portion of chips with that fish, please. ’
Clerk in fast - food restaurant: ‘Do you want a bag of chops with that sandwich?’
4. Separated by the same language?
What does the headline mean? Discuss this quotation by George Bernard Shaw means, historically and today. Do you know any historical events that may have shaped differences between Americans and British people? Do you personally know any Americans or any British people? Have you noticed any differences? What about British and American TV programmes and movies? Or newspapers and magazines? You may look at some web pages for major British and American papers and see if you can see any differences.

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